I’ve been tutoring since 2004. I attended Princeton University and studied molecular biology; in high school, I completed the IB program and took a total of 11 AP exams. 

Tutoring Subjects:

  • Math: pre-algebra, algebra 1, geometry, algebra 2, trigonometry, precalculus, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, Calculus 1, AP Statistics
  • Science: chemistry up to IB/AP/college first-year chem, physics up to AP Physics 1, intro biology, life science, earth science
  • AP Computer Science Principles
  • AP Human Geography
  • U.S. history, world history
  • English, Spanish up to AP/IB Spanish, French (up to French II)

Ages I’ve Worked With:

I work with students in grades 6-12, as well as adults. The large majority of my students are high-schoolers, across the board -- traditional public schools, selective/magnet public schools, and private schools.

My Tutoring Style:

I strongly value developing a collaborative relationship with my students. Too often, students feel that their school teachers are rigid authority figures, talking at them for an eternity, convinced that they’re teaching the one right method. Instead, right out of the gate, I prioritize giving personalized feedback -- diagnosing my student’s knowledge gaps and strategy blind spots, so that what they learn in our sessions is tailored to them, where they’re at, and how their brain works. This then informs how I explain concepts to them -- precisely, with firm roots and reassuring logic, not as arbitrary instructions. 

Not only do students appreciate the reassurance of developing clear step-by-step problem-solving procedures, but our rapport also gets them comfortable speaking up and asking if there’s another way to get to the solution. Humanizing myself to them is my aim from Day One: pointing out common pitfalls, discussing how to catch silly mistakes, noting concepts that I initially had trouble with too as a kid, offering multiple explanations and analogies so that they can pick what makes the most sense to them, speaking casually, and cracking jokes are all ways to decouple our sessions from any negativity they feel about school, and instead create a comfortable, supportive, reliable environment where they can build confidence, conquer overwhelm, and achieve competence … even mastery! 

Overall, my students build the executive functioning skills that are crucial to smooth academic progress, like staying organized, breaking big projects into smaller tasks to avoid overwhelm, keeping track of what they’re doing in the middle of a long math problem, and not letting assignments slip through the cracks. We talk about how to study, to avoid the dreaded “I know I know this!” mind-blank on test day. As my students get results and develop trust in my help, they come to see me as a friendly expert guide, whom they now have for the rest of their high school career.

Success Story:

When one mom enlisted me to help her twin sophomore daughters in geometry, they were getting B’s and C’s. Although they weren’t completely checked out, they weren’t exactly reaching for the stars either. Nor were they particularly enthused about meeting with me; their standoffishness made clear that this was going to be tough! In addition, their note-taking was haphazard, and they made the very common mistake of using the teacher-provided study guide as their sole method for studying for a test.

Fortunately, by now I know the common misconceptions, misunderstandings, and doubts that students have about a given topic. Even though the girls didn’t speak up much, I could surmise -- from experience and from their body language -- what they were struggling with. With time, as they saw my suggestions accurately pinpoint their confusion, I sensed their appreciation of having me as a reliable resource. Just a few weeks after we met, one of the girls got an A on a quiz, and the mom was thrilled: “I’m taking this as a Mother’s Day present!” Their grades gradually shifted to solid B’s and intermittent A’s.

To avoid overwhelm when studying for a test, I advised them to make a “study guide” while they progressed through the unit, so that they’d have all the big ideas in one place with plenty of time before the test. Then they could use the teacher-provided study guide as a quiz: “Am I truly ready for this test?” I made this a consistent part of our routine. After some time, I knew that I had gotten through to them when I noticed one of them come to our session saying, “Okay, so we started a new unit, and I started a study guide here …” A student taking initiative  -- the ultimate compliment! She had taken my guidance and finally made it her own -- acting without my prompting -- and the benefits will follow her into college and beyond!

Hobbies and Interests:

  • Skiing and snowboarding
  • PC games (Civilization V!)
  • Learning to draw
  • Computer programming

Math: pre-algebra, algebra 1, geometry, algebra 2, trigonometry, precalculus, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, Calculus 1, AP Statistics

Science: chemistry up to IB/AP/college first-year chem, physics up to AP Physics 1, intro biology, life science, earth science

AP Computer Science Principles

AP Human Geography

U.S. history, world history

English

Spanish up to AP/IB Spanish

French (up to French II)

Ages I’ve Worked With

I work with students in grades 6-12, as well as adults. The large majority of my students are high-schoolers, across the board -- traditional public schools, selective/magnet public schools, and private schools.

Success Story

When one mom enlisted me to help her twin sophomore daughters in geometry, they were getting B’s and C’s. Although they weren’t completely checked out, they weren’t exactly reaching for the stars either. Nor were they particularly enthused about meeting with me; their standoffishness made clear that this was going to be tough! In addition, their note-taking was haphazard, and they made the very common mistake of using the teacher-provided study guide as their sole method for studying for a test.

Fortunately, by now I know the common misconceptions, misunderstandings, and doubts that students have about a given topic. Even though the girls didn’t speak up much, I could surmise -- from experience and from their body language -- what they were struggling with. With time, as they saw my suggestions accurately pinpoint their confusion, I sensed their appreciation of having me as a reliable resource. Just a few weeks after we met, one of the girls got an A on a quiz, and the mom was thrilled: “I’m taking this as a Mother’s Day present!” Their grades gradually shifted to solid B’s and intermittent A’s.

To avoid overwhelm when studying for a test, I advised them to make a “study guide” while they progressed through the unit, so that they’d have all the big ideas in one place with plenty of time before the test. Then they could use the teacher-provided study guide as a quiz: “Am I truly ready for this test?” I made this a consistent part of our routine. After some time, I knew that I had gotten through to them when I noticed one of them come to our session saying, “Okay, so we started a new unit, and I started a study guide here …” A student taking initiative  -- the ultimate compliment! She had taken my guidance and finally made it her own -- acting without my prompting -- and the benefits will follow her into college and beyond!

Recent tutoring subjects: